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Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument located in the English county of Wiltshire, about 2.0 miles (3.2 km) west of Amesbury and 8 miles (13 km) north of Salisbury. One of the most famous sites in the world, Stonehenge is composed of a circular setting of largestanding stones set within earthworks. It is at the centre of the most dense complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments in England, including several hundred burial mounds.[1]
Archaeologists believe the iconic stone monument was constructed anywhere from 3000 BC to 2000 BC, as described in the chronology below. Radiocarbon dating in 2008 suggested that the first stones were erected in 2400–2200 BC,[2] whilst another theory suggests that bluestones may have been erected at the site as early as 3000 BC (see phase 1 below).
The surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC. The site and its surroundings were added to the UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites in 1986 in a co-listing with Avebury Hengemonument. It is a national legally protected Scheduled Ancient Monument. Stonehenge is owned by the Crown and managed by English Heritage, while the surrounding land is owned by the National Trust.[3][4]
Archaeological evidence found by the Stonehenge Riverside Project in 2008 indicates that Stonehenge could possibly have served as aburial ground from its earliest beginnings.[5] The dating of cremated remains found on the site indicate that deposits contain human bone material from as early as 3000 BC, when the initial ditch and bank were first dug. Such deposits continued at Stonehenge for at least another 500 years.

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument located in the English county of Wiltshire, about 2.0 miles (3.2 km) west of Amesbury and 8 miles (13 km) north of Salisbury. One of the most famous sites in the world, Stonehenge is composed of a circular setting of largestanding stones set within earthworks. It is at the centre of the most dense complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments in England, including several hundred burial mounds.[1]

Archaeologists believe the iconic stone monument was constructed anywhere from 3000 BC to 2000 BC, as described in the chronology below. Radiocarbon dating in 2008 suggested that the first stones were erected in 2400–2200 BC,[2] whilst another theory suggests that bluestones may have been erected at the site as early as 3000 BC (see phase 1 below).

The surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC. The site and its surroundings were added to the UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites in 1986 in a co-listing with Avebury Hengemonument. It is a national legally protected Scheduled Ancient Monument. Stonehenge is owned by the Crown and managed by English Heritage, while the surrounding land is owned by the National Trust.[3][4]

Archaeological evidence found by the Stonehenge Riverside Project in 2008 indicates that Stonehenge could possibly have served as aburial ground from its earliest beginnings.[5] The dating of cremated remains found on the site indicate that deposits contain human bone material from as early as 3000 BC, when the initial ditch and bank were first dug. Such deposits continued at Stonehenge for at least another 500 years.




Photo Post Tue, May. 15, 2012 2 notes

Petra is a site in the Arabah, Jordan that was discovered by a Swiss explorer called Johann Ludwig Burckhardt in 1812 and is considered to be, yet another splendid beauty in the history of mankind. Arabah is a section of the Great Rift Valley and it is located between the Dead Sea (north) and the Gulf of Aqaba (south) forming part of the border between Jordan (east) and Israel (west).
Petra represents the ancient world’s heritage culture. It is a beauty hidden behind layers of mountain. The ones who have seen it say it is a treasure beyond comparison. It is now said to be one of the seventh wonder of the world and it belongs to the UNESCO world heritage site. The entire red rose city of Petra has such a charismatic appeal that it attracts anyone & everyone who enters the city, taking them to a different world of divine beauty and mystery. Petra mainly is admired because of its picture perfect architecture, its complex structure, quality and the non mentionable mere size.
Petra is said to have its origin before 106 AD; its culture is said to have been flourished in almost 400 years old. The one’s who visited it say that it is a site that can never be forgotten. The city of Petra takes its name, which is the Greek word for “rock”, from the fact that it is most notable for its buildings and tombs that are carved directly into the red sandstone that serves as the city’s natural protection from invaders. Its popularity with tourists may also have a connection to the city’s Biblical significance. It is here where King Aretas called for the arrest of the Apostle Paul at the time of his conversion.

Petra is a site in the Arabah, Jordan that was discovered by a Swiss explorer called Johann Ludwig Burckhardt in 1812 and is considered to be, yet another splendid beauty in the history of mankind. Arabah is a section of the Great Rift Valley and it is located between the Dead Sea (north) and the Gulf of Aqaba (south) forming part of the border between Jordan (east) and Israel (west).

Petra represents the ancient world’s heritage culture. It is a beauty hidden behind layers of mountain. The ones who have seen it say it is a treasure beyond comparison. It is now said to be one of the seventh wonder of the world and it belongs to the UNESCO world heritage site. The entire red rose city of Petra has such a charismatic appeal that it attracts anyone & everyone who enters the city, taking them to a different world of divine beauty and mystery. Petra mainly is admired because of its picture perfect architecture, its complex structure, quality and the non mentionable mere size.

Petra is said to have its origin before 106 AD; its culture is said to have been flourished in almost 400 years old. The one’s who visited it say that it is a site that can never be forgotten. The city of Petra takes its name, which is the Greek word for “rock”, from the fact that it is most notable for its buildings and tombs that are carved directly into the red sandstone that serves as the city’s natural protection from invaders. Its popularity with tourists may also have a connection to the city’s Biblical significance. It is here where King Aretas called for the arrest of the Apostle Paul at the time of his conversion.




Photo Post Tue, May. 15, 2012 58 notes

thisbelongsinamuseum:

The Angel of the North, located in Gateshead, England, is a contemporary steel sculpture designed over fifteen years ago by artist Antony Gormley. The thing is as tall as four double decker buses and has a wingspan as big as that of a jumbo jet. It is also seen by 90,000 people in cars every day on the A1 (here is the angel’s view…don’t look like heaven to me). Every time a car horn beeps a freakin’ huge angel gets his wind-resistant wings.
(Image Source)

thisbelongsinamuseum:

The Angel of the North, located in Gateshead, England, is a contemporary steel sculpture designed over fifteen years ago by artist Antony Gormley. The thing is as tall as four double decker buses and has a wingspan as big as that of a jumbo jet. It is also seen by 90,000 people in cars every day on the A1 (here is the angel’s view…don’t look like heaven to me). Every time a car horn beeps a freakin’ huge angel gets his wind-resistant wings.

(Image Source)




Photo Post Tue, May. 15, 2012 128 notes

The Colosseum, or the Coliseum, originally the Flavian Amphitheatre (Latin: Amphitheatrum Flavium, Italian Anfiteatro Flavio or Colosseo), is an elliptical amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy, the largest ever built in the Roman Empire. It is considered one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and Roman engineering.
Occupying a site just east of the Roman Forum, its construction started in 72 AD under the emperor Vespasian and was completed in 80 AD under Titus, with further modifications being made during Domitian's reign (81–96). The name “Amphitheatrum Flavium" derives from both Vespasian’s and Titus’s family name (Flavius, from the gens Flavia).
Capable of seating 50,000 spectators, the Colosseum was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles, animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on Classical mythology. The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era. It was later reused for such purposes as housing, workshops, quarters for a religious order, a fortress, aquarry, and a Christian shrine.
Although in the 21st century it stays partially ruined because of damage caused by devastating earthquakes and stone-robbers, the Colosseum is an iconic symbol of Imperial Rome. It is one of Rome’s most popular tourist attractions and still has close connections with the Roman Catholic Church, as each Good Friday the Pope leads a torchlit "Way of the Cross" procession that starts in the area around the Colosseum.
The Colosseum is also depicted on the Italian version of the five-cent euro coin.

The Colosseum, or the Coliseum, originally the Flavian Amphitheatre (LatinAmphitheatrum Flavium, Italian Anfiteatro Flavio or Colosseo), is an elliptical amphitheatre in the centre of the city of RomeItaly, the largest ever built in the Roman Empire. It is considered one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and Roman engineering.

Occupying a site just east of the Roman Forum, its construction started in 72 AD under the emperor Vespasian and was completed in 80 AD under Titus, with further modifications being made during Domitian's reign (81–96). The name “Amphitheatrum Flavium" derives from both Vespasian’s and Titus’s family name (Flavius, from the gens Flavia).

Capable of seating 50,000 spectators, the Colosseum was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles, animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on Classical mythology. The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era. It was later reused for such purposes as housing, workshops, quarters for a religious order, a fortress, aquarry, and a Christian shrine.

Although in the 21st century it stays partially ruined because of damage caused by devastating earthquakes and stone-robbers, the Colosseum is an iconic symbol of Imperial Rome. It is one of Rome’s most popular tourist attractions and still has close connections with the Roman Catholic Church, as each Good Friday the Pope leads a torchlit "Way of the Cross" procession that starts in the area around the Colosseum.

The Colosseum is also depicted on the Italian version of the five-cent euro coin.

(Source: cntraveler.com, via condenasttraveler)




Photo Post Sun, May. 06, 2012 344 notes


To the Sea | Dinard, France


To the Sea
| Dinard, France

(via condenasttraveler)




Video Post Fri, May. 04, 2012 148 notes

thisbelongsinamuseum:

Thanks to that movie Amélie everyone thinks they’re being cute or adventurous by taking a gnome with them on a trip. A few years ago an acquaintance of mine was “doing Europe” (that shit makes me groan) by seeing like 15 countries in 60 days. If you figured out this ridiculous math problem, then your answer would be 4 days per country. I’d rather spend 60 days in one country to tell you the truth. It’s a more meaningful way to experience the culture’s in and outs, then just getting another stamp on your passport and showing off to your friends that you saw Italy, even though you were there for five seconds. Anyway, the point of this story is the dude’s gnome broke in half while he was in the first country. That might be a sign of bad luck, and even though he had a great time, he admitted that he should have gone to less places. No, really? DUH!!!

Well, if he wasn’t so busy traveling from Denmark to France and back to Greece and stopped to take a goddamn breath, then he could have paid a visit to the Gnome Reserve and Museum. On England’s Devon/Cornwall border lies a magical world, home to over a thousand garden gnomes. There are ponds, woods, meadows, streams and flowers, which is lovely for picture-taking I’m sure, but people just want to see the freakin’ fantastical “Earthmen” (that was a geeky Narnia reference for you). The reserve is recommended for “adults whose sophistication has robbed them of a freshness of vision”…um, does that mean pessimists are allowed? Cool! Even though it costs money, there are free gnome hats and fishing poles as well as the opportunity to see the pottery pixies made on site. Oh, and there is tea! Remember it’s not the destination that’s important, it’s the journey. And the journey is sitting quietly with tea and cake and scones while surrounded by gnomes. Word.

(Image Source 1, 2, 3)





EUROPEAN HORIZON !!! 10 DAYS , 7 COUNTRIES !!


Seven countries in ten days…sounds like a tour for people who know what they want and don’t have time to wait around for it! This is a great introduction to Europe for first timers, giving you a taste for more. Wear clogs in Amsterdam, visit a beerhall in Munich and cruise the canals of venice on a gondola you won’t want to miss a moment! This tour is also one of the best scenery for lovers with drives over the famous Brenner Pass and past Lake Como.

EUROPEAN HORIZON !!! 10 DAYS , 7 COUNTRIES !!


Seven countries in ten days…sounds like a tour for people who know what they want and don’t have time to wait around for it! This is a great introduction to Europe for first timers, giving you a taste for more. Wear clogs in Amsterdam, visit a beerhall in Munich and cruise the canals of venice on a gondola you won’t want to miss a moment! This tour is also one of the best scenery for lovers with drives over the famous Brenner Pass and past Lake Como.




Photo Post Thu, May. 03, 2012 84 notes

condenasttraveler:

Hot List All-Stars | Hoshinoya, Kyoto, Japan

condenasttraveler:

Hot List All-Stars | Hoshinoya, Kyoto, Japan





Photo Post Thu, May. 03, 2012 174 notes

thebeatenpath:

Tabacco Bay by Rob Boudreau

thebeatenpath:

Tabacco Bay by 

(via condenasttraveler)



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